Displaying episodes 1 - 30 of 120 in total

Transformative Change to Protect Biodiversity, Climate

We're joined by Dr. Pam McElwee, Professor of Human Ecology at Rutgers University, and Dr. Sarah Diamond, Associate Professor of Biology at Case Western Reserve University. They were here to discuss their recent BioScience article, Governing for Transformative Change across the Biodiversity–Climate–Society Nexus, which describes principles for addressing global environmental crises.

Social Justice and Conservation Education

We're joined by Dr. Robert Montgomery, Associate Professor of Biodiversity and Sustainability, Senior Research Fellow in Lady Margaret Hall College, and Senior Researcher in the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, at Oxford University. He's here to talk about his recent BioScience article, Integrating Social Justice into Higher Education Conservation Science.

Learning What Our Ancestors Ate with Stable Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids

Thomas Larsen and Patrick Roberts of the Max Planck Institute of the Science of Human History join us to discuss how we can learn about early hominins diets using stable isotope analysis.

Dams and Their Evolutionary Consequences

In this episode, we're joined by Liam Zarri, PhD student at Cornell University, and Dr. Eric Palkovacs, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. They discuss their recent BioScience article on evolutionary effects of dams on riverine fishes.

Drought Response and the Decline of Eastern Oaks

In this episode, we discuss eastern oaks and their various responses to drought conditions.

Public Engagement Benefits Scientists

The positive effects of scientist engagement with the general public are well documented, but most investigations have focused on the benefits to the public rather than on those performing engagement activities. Nalini Nadkarni of the University of Utah and colleagues "reverse the lens" on public engagement with science, discovering numerous benefits for scientists involved in these efforts.

Minority-Serving Institutions and Grant Review Representation

In this episode, AIBS scientists Stephen A. Gallo, Joanne H. Sullivan, and DaJoie R. Croslan describe the results of a survey disseminated to thousands of minority-serving-institution-based scientists, aimed at elucidating discrepancies in grant review participation between MSI-based scientists and those who work at traditionally White institutions.

Resist–Accept–Direct, a Paradigm for Management

Natural resource managers worldwide face a growing challenge: Global change increasingly propels ecosystems on strong trajectories toward irreversible ecological transformations. Dr. Gregor Schuurman describes.

In Their Own Words: Thomas Lovejoy III (Republication)

The American Institute of Biological Sciences, publisher of the BioScience Talks podcast, mourns the loss of visionary ecologist Thomas E. Lovejoy III. Earlier this year, he joined us for an episode of our oral history series, In Their Own Words, which we republish here in memoriam.

Coral Reefs: Insults and Prospects

Dr. Michael Lesser joins us to discuss coral reefs, eutrophication, bleaching, symbiosis, climate change, and other stressors.

Biodiversity Collections Enable Foundational and Data Skills

The task of training an effective cadre of biodiversity scientists has grown more challenging in recent years, as foundational skills and knowledge in organismal biology have increasingly required complementary data skills and knowledge. In this episode, workforce training is discussed by Anna Monfils, Erica Krimmel, and Travis Marsico, who discuss a module that addresses these needs.

Disease Transmission: The Case of Sarcoptes Scabiei

In this episode of BioScience Talks, we're joined by Liz Browne and Scott Carver of the University of Tasmania to discuss Sarcoptes scabiei, the mite that causes mange in animals.

Values and Water Security in a Dry Era

BioScience authors Paolo D'Odorico and Willis Jenkins join us to discuss their framework for integrating different values into a holistic conception of water security.

Empowering Communities through Local Monitoring

BioScience handling editors Rick Bonney, of Cornell University, and Finn Danielsen, of the Nordic Foundation for Development and Ecology (NORDECO) join us to discuss an open-access special section on community-based monitoring programs and the broader future for the field.

In Their Own Words: Nalini Nadkarni

This episode is the next in our oral history series, In Their Own Words, featuring Nalini Nadkarni, professor of biology at the University of Utah.

The Climate Emergency in a COVID Year

In this episode of BioScience Talks, Climate Emergency coauthor Jillian Gregg, who is with the Sustainability Double Degree program and the Department of Crop and Soil Science at Oregon State University, joins us to discuss the latest climate update and the urgent actions needed ensure the long-term sustainability of human civilization.

Blackologists and the Promise of Inclusive Sustainability

Drs. Senay Yitbarek (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Karen Bailey (University of Colorado Boulder), Nyeema Harris (Yale University) join us to discuss inclusive sustainability and the ways in which it can be brought to bear in service of ecosystems and the humans who inhabit them.

The COVID-19 Pandemic, Viral Evolution, Vaccines, and Variants

Guests Dr. Charlie Fenster, Pam Soltis, and Paul Turner discuss viral evolution and how best to respond to the current COVID-19 pandemic in the vaccine era, as well as to emerging pathogens.

Environmental DNA and RNA May Be Key in Monitoring Pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2

A discussion of environmental DNA and RNA (eDNA and eRNA, respectively) and its potential for pathogen monitoring.

In Their Own Words: John E. Burris

This episode is the next in our oral history series, In Their Own Words, featuring John E. Burris, emeritus president of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

Urban Ecology, Segregation, and the Work of the Baltimore Field Station

Dr. Morgan Grove of the USDA Baltimore Field Station joins us to discuss urban ecology, segregation, environmental justice, and the efforts of the USDA Forest Service's Baltimore Field Station.

Using Citations to Find Scientific Communities

George Chacko (University of Illinois) and Steve Gallo (American Institute of Biological Sciences) discuss using article citations to generate "clusters" that reflect scientific communities.

In Their Own Words: Thomas Lovejoy

This episode is the next in our oral history series, In Their Own Words. These pieces chronicle the stories of scientists who have made great contributions to their fields, particularly within the biological sciences. Each month, we will publish in the pages of BioScience, and on this podcast, the results of these conversations. Dr. Lovejoy is a Professor at George Mason University, in Fairfax, Virginia, Explorer at Large with the National Geographic Society, and Senior Fellow at the United Nations Foundation. He is also a past president of AIBS. Note: Both the text and audio versions have been edited for clarity and length. Read this article in BioScience. Subscribe on iTunes. Subscribe on Stitcher. Catch up with us on Twitter.  

Indigenous Systems of Management for Healthier Fisheries

Before European colonization, populations of Pacific salmon were successfully managed by the Indigenous communities of the Pacific Northwest since time immemorial. Colonization and its associated fisheries management practices have depleted stocks and disrupted the complex social–ecological systems that underlie them.  In this episode, we're joined by Will Atlas, a salmon watershed scientist with the Wild Salmon Center; Andrea Reid, citizen and member of the Nisga’a Nation, in British Columbia, and an assistant professor with the University of British Columbia; and William G. Housty of the Heiltsuck First Nation and the Heiltsuk Integrated Resource Management Department. Our guests describe how a return to traditional management may revitalize these fisheries and bolster the fishing communities that depend on them. Read this article in BioScience. Subscribe on iTunes. Subscribe on Stitcher. Catch up with us on Twitter.  

SlothBot: Engaging the Public with Robot Ecology

Despite having a professed trust in the science, many members of the public fall short when it comes to making choices that protect the environment and support informed decision-making. To help excite and inspire broad audiences to have a greater appreciation for and engagement with science, our guests today, Jonathan Pauli, associate professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Magnus Egerstedt, robotics professor at Georgia Tech, have created SlothBot. The forest-canopy-dwelling robot, which mirrors its biological counterparts in many ways, offers an exciting platform for learning—about robotics, ecology, and more. Read this article in BioScience. Subscribe on iTunes. Subscribe on Stitcher. Catch up with us on Twitter.  

In Their Own Words: Peter Raven

This episode is the next in our oral history series, In Their Own Words. These pieces chronicle the stories of scientists who have made great contributions to their fields, particularly within the biological sciences. Each month, we will publish in the pages of BioScience, and on this podcast, the results of these conversations.  Today, we are joined by Peter Raven, president emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden, in St. Louis, Missouri. He is also a past president of AIBS. Note: Both the text and audio versions have been edited for clarity and length. Read this article in BioScience. Subscribe on iTunes. Subscribe on Stitcher. Catch up with us on Twitter.  

In Their Own Words: Alan Covich

This episode is the next in our oral history series, In Their Own Words. These pieces chronicle the stories of scientists who have made great contributions to their fields, particularly within the biological sciences. Each month, we will publish in the pages of BioScience, and on this podcast, the results of these conversations.  Today, we are joined by Alan Covich, Professor of Ecology at the Odum School of Ecology, at the University of Georgia. He is also a past president of AIBS. Note: Both the text and audio versions have been edited for clarity and length. Read this article in BioScience. Subscribe on iTunes. Subscribe on Stitcher. Catch up with us on Twitter.  

Virtual Meetings in the Pandemic Era: American Society for Gravitational and Space Research

The COVID-19 pandemic has produced numerous challenges for scientific societies and organizations, including the necessity to quickly move large in-person meetings to a fully online format. Joining us on this episode of BioScience Talks is Dr. Kevin Sato, past president of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research and chair of the organizing committee for the 2020 ASGSR Virtual Meeting. He describes the planning and execution of this novel event and provides an early look into the society's plans for 2021. The ASGSR 2020 Virtual Meeting Subscribe on iTunes. Subscribe on Stitcher. Catch up with us on Twitter.  

Science Leaders Issue Clarion Call for Evidence-Based Policy

Since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, US science leaders and others have expressed frustration with the lack of an informed and coherent federal response, a sentiment that echoes objections to the handling of other pressing issues, such as climate change. Writing in BioScience, an assemblage of the past presidents of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) have issued an appeal for the reinvigoration of sound policy and governance through the careful consideration of sound science. In this episode BioScience Talks, we're joined by AIBS President Charles Fenster, Director of the Oak Lake Field Station, which is affiliated with South Dakota State University in Brookings, South Dakota. He discusses the article with us, and the conversation is followed by a presentation of the article by the past presidents, themselves.  (Enter the contest described by emailing your guess to bioscience@aibs.org) Read this article in BioScience. Subscribe on iTunes. Subscribe on Stitcher. Catch up with us on Twitter.  

Trump Administration Delists Gray Wolves: Response from the Experts

On 29 October 2020, the US Fish and Wildlife Service announced the "successful recovery" of the US gray wolf population, with US Secretary of the Interior Secretary David Bernhardt stating that the species had "exceeded all conservation goals for recovery." These claims have been rebutted by numerous experts, who argue that the delisting decision is premature. Writing in BioScience, independent ecologist Carlos Carroll and colleagues argue that the declarations of recovery should be based on a more ambitious definition of recovery than one requiring the existence of a single secure population. Instead, they propose a framework for the "conservation of adaptive potential," which builds on existing agency practice to enhance the effectiveness of the Act. The authors argue that such an approach is particularly crucial in light of climate change and other ongoing threats to species. On this episode of BioScience Talks, Dr. Carroll is joined by coauthors Adrian Treves, Bridgett vonHoldt, and Dan Rohlf to discuss the recent USFWS action as well as prospects for gray wolf conservation. Read this article in BioScience. Subscribe on iTunes. Subscribe on Stitcher. Catch up with us on Twitter.  

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